‘A Dish of Swallow’s Nest With Julienned Smoked Duck, Cooked by Chang Er’ – A talk at Sunday Papers Live.

Above is a dish that Andrew Wong created in 2017 for the menu at his restaurant A. Wong in London. It is based on the research that we conducted into the history of Chinese food and in particular, the art and craft of dim sum, or small eats, over the centuries. It is Andrew’s interpretation … Continue reading ‘A Dish of Swallow’s Nest With Julienned Smoked Duck, Cooked by Chang Er’ – A talk at Sunday Papers Live.

Would you like to present your reflections or research on food and the future?

My colleagues and I are organising a panel at the European Association of Social Anthropologists conference in Stockholm in August. The panel is called ‘Moving on: Food Futures and Reimagining Uncertainty’ This panel is about how food ‘moves on’ across time and space, borders and bodies. From everyday practices to overarching value systems, we will … Continue reading Would you like to present your reflections or research on food and the future?

What is good food? A podcast series produced by me and food researchers at the SOAS Food Studies Centre

It’s been a busy summer. After taking part in the research workshop ‘What is Good Food’ in London in June, convened by researchers at the SOAS Food Studies Centre and Warwick Food GRP, we’ve been busy organising a series of podcasts based on some of our papers. The podcasts are conversations about ‘good food’ – … Continue reading What is good food? A podcast series produced by me and food researchers at the SOAS Food Studies Centre

Imagining South Asian food in Cantonese cities; balichão, idlis, and momos

As Lizzie Collingham states in the preface to her biography of curry published back in 2006, there are dishes that are very familiar to ‘habitués of Indian restaurants’; chicken tikka masala, vindaloo, biryani, korma. But time and money can change what we expect from our Indian eateries. As new elite restaurateurs do battle with older … Continue reading Imagining South Asian food in Cantonese cities; balichão, idlis, and momos

‘It’s an old recipe but does it taste good?’ Some stories of heritage foods in Macau

When we think of protecting certain food as an important part of a country’s cultural heritage, we assume that the food is tasty. We assume that people have enjoyed eating it throughout its history, and enjoy eating it still in the current day. Can this ever be an erroneous assumption? Do certain dishes and their … Continue reading ‘It’s an old recipe but does it taste good?’ Some stories of heritage foods in Macau